Baffled caged bird feeders with built in cage grid keeps out squirrels, large birds like crows, starlings, grackles and jays. Chew proof metal suet, seed bird feeders.



Baffled Cage Squirrel Proof, Starling Resistant Bird Feeders

Bird House Bath Home > Cage Baffle Feeders

Caged seed bird feeders with built in baffles are another answer to squirrel proofing bird feeders. Caged bird feeders provide some type of cage around the actual feeder area. Dual-grid feeders are designed so that the feeder and perches are equally enclosed by a metal cage or grid with holes big enough to admit the birds inside to eat, while at the same time, too small for a larger critter such as a squirrel to be able to access, effectively keeping squirrels out. This can also help with bully birds at feeders as the grid can be too small for the larger birds to pass through. If grackles, starlings, jays or crows are a problem these may help.

All Weather seed bird feeder with built in wire cage baffle. Keep large birds and squirrel from seed, water Baffled to keep away large birds, squirrels. Blue glass meal worm cup, strong galvanized steel grid. Attravt backyard Mini Bluebird Cage Baffle bird feeder. Create a backyard habitat and attract insect eating wild songbirds
Sky Cafe Bluebird bird feeder with build in baffle surrounding feeding bowl, the perfect solution to keep out jays Duncraft Caged Meal worm bluebird bird feeder. Metal cage feeding system, plastic weather shield Wire grid caging around seed tube, room for species to perch. Hanging or post mount. Squirrel proof bird feeder for baby
Grid prevents squirrels, large birds from reaching feeding ports. Backyard bird watchers best squirrel proof Weight activated squirrel proof feeder. Heavier weight automatically drops outer grid blocks food access Best bird feeder. Roof protects seed from weather, metal ports, squirrel lock to keep away seed hogging critters
Duncraft Accent Selective bird feeder with wire squirrel proof cage baffle. Stop squirrels from eating Metal roof, grid and tray squirrel proof bird feeder. Fill triple tubes with different food to attract garden songbirds Duncraft Bird Sanctuary
Squirrel, starling proof peanut or nut bird feeder. Wire mesh tube enclosed in fencing keeps out bully species. Backyard Wild Bird Squirrel Proof Cage Peanut bird feeder. Supply backyard songbirds nuts food, keep out Duncraft Weather Guard bird feeder with metal chew proof cage stops squirrels from eating seeds
Stainless steel mesh tube, fencing blocks squirrel reach. Backyard birds perch on grid. Attract, feed backyard garden Squirrel Blocker with Guard. Fill with sunflower seeds or favorite food mix and attract wild bird species Wild Bird Easy bird feeder. Chew, rust resistant outer grid around seed bin keeps squirrels and pesky
Squirrel Shield Tube Feeder Squirrel Stumper Feeder. Resistant metal. Backyard wild bird watchers best pick to attract garden songbirds to habitat Baffled bird feeder finished in bronze copper color. Keep food safe from starlings and squirrels.
Squirrel Proof Double Suet squirrel proof bird feeder. Protect suet food from large birds, enjoy backyard Metal caged fencing keeps away squirrels food is out of reach. Chickadees, nuthatches, woodpeckers Droll Yankees Nyjer Caged Baffled goldfinch bird feeder for nyjer seed. Best idea for attracting goldfinches
Cage bird feeder for small songbirds and thistle eating species. Squirrel proof, bird feeder grid Specialty caged bird feeder holds thistle eating wild birds. Squirrel proof, large bird proof grid guards seed tube Squirrel Proof Window mount selective seed bird feeder. Bring wild songbirds close, attache to window glass

 

cage bird feeders

Caged bird feeders are an answer to squirrel proofing bird feeders. They provide some type of baffle around the actual feeder area. Dual-grid feeders are designed so that the feeder and perches are equally enclosed by a metal cage or grid with holes big enough to admit the birds inside to eat, while at the same time, too small for a larger critter such as a squirrel to be able to access, effectively keeping squirrels out. This can also help with bully birds at feeders as the grid can be too small for the larger birds to pass through. If grackles, starlings, jays or crows are a problem these may help. If you are having problems with larger birds eating all of the food out of your bird feeders, a feeder with a cage around it may be the answer. The larger birds can not fit through the cage to get to the food.

Starlings tend to be one of the biggest problems at feeding stations. While these birds tend to prefer to feed on the ground, they will also take over feeders if that is the food available to them. Suet seems to be their food of choice. If you have been invaded by starlings, you can take your feeders down for a week or two and hope that the flock moves on, which they will, but this will depend on if someone else in your area is feeding them.

If you wish to continue feeding the birds, make your feeding stations inaccessible to the starlings with a cage and stop feeding in open, platform areas or on the ground. We have found the cage system to be the most effective against starlings and crows. The down side of these cages is that they keep out larger woodpeckers as well.

How to discourage starlings from roosting
Discouraging a flock of starlings from roosting close to a home may be challenging. Setting up a plastic model hawk or owl nearby might help, however if this is the only deterrent starlings will quickly recognize the plastic hawk presents no threat and disregard it. It is more beneficial to utilize a predator decoy in combination with additional bird deterrent, such as audio recordings of starling distress calls played through a backyard speaker.

Loud noises will flush bird flocks from trees. To create loud noises, some people make use of fireworks, or bang kitchen pots and pans. Occasionally merely loud hand clapping can be sufficient to disturb a flock of starlings roosting in the area.

All the same the roosting starlings might continue to return to the roosting spot but if you scare the birds away each evening for about a week, they could relocate to a different roost. To deter them you must be relentless to ward off having a starling flock get established in a backyard. It is more difficult to get down a flock to relocate when they have colonized at at a roost location. These birds are persistent, you must be persistent as well.